Steve Koczela President, The MassINC Polling Group

Steve Koczela is the President of The MassINC Polling Group, where he has grown the organization from its infancy to a nationally known and respected polling provider. During the 2014 election cycle, MPG conducted election polling for WBUR, the continuation of a three-year partnership. Koczela again led the endeavor, producing polls which came within one point of the margin in both the Massachusetts gubernatorial and U.S. Senate Elections. He was also lead writer for Poll Vault, WBUR’s political reporting section during the 2014 Election Cycle.

He has led survey research programs for the U.S. Department of State in Iraq, in key states for President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign, and has conducted surveys and polls on behalf of many private corporations. Koczela brings a deep understanding of the foundations of public opinion and a wide ranging methodological expertise. He earned U.S. Department of State recognition for his leading edge work on sample evaluation in post conflict areas using geospatial systems.

Koczela is frequent guest on WBUR as well as many other news and talk programs in Massachusetts and elsewhere. His polling analysis is often cited in local, state, and national media outlets. He currently serves as President of the New England Chapter of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (NEAAPOR). Koczela holds a Master’s degree in Marketing Research from the University of Wisconsin and is a veteran of the war in Iraq.

ARTICLES By Steve Koczela

The Topline from MPG

Solar’s future’s so bright it’s gonna need shades

Governor Baker popped down the hall yesterday to testify in support of his administration’s bill lifting the cap on net metering for solar power projects. Net metering allows residents, businesses or municipalities to “sell back” solar power to the grid, lowering their electric bills, in some cases to the point where the power company actually

New Paper Finds Evidence of Fabrication in International Surveys

Curbstoning and beyond: Confronting data fabrication in survey research Steve Koczela, Cathy Furlong, Jaki McCarthy and Ali Mushtaq Data fabrication (i.e. creating fake survey data) has been a concern since the beginning of organized survey research. The risk has always been present that someone in the chain of survey data collection and processing would simply invent

Looking for Leadership

Public Opinion in Massachusetts on the Response to Global Warming

Massachusetts residents “strongly support” a wide range of policies to combat and prepare for global warming, including investing in renewable energy and public transit. This support stems from broad belief that the effects of global warming are either already underway, or have already begun, and will be damaging for Massachusetts – three-quarters think Massachusetts will

Ready for Reform?

Public Opinion on Criminal Justice in Massachusetts

This full report expands on the findings presented at MassINC’s Criminal Justice Summit with Gov. Patrick in February 2013. The research – a poll of Massachusetts residents and four focus groups, conducted by the non-partisan MassINC Polling Group – shows that Bay Staters want a criminal justice system that is effective at reducing crimes through

Creative Places

Public Perceptions of Arts, Culture, and Economic Development in Gateway Cities

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This poll was commissioned by MassINC as part of a newly-funded initiative to create a leadership network around the role of the arts in the economic revitalization of Gateway Cities, a strategy the National Endowment for the Arts calls “creative placemaking.” The survey, given to 600 registered voters among the eleven Gateway Cities, informs that

MassINC’s Middle Class Index

The first-of-its-kind Middle Class Index is designed to serve as a barometer of the status of middle class residents. Composed of 26 different indicators, the overall score for Massachusetts in 2010 was 97.4, down 2.6 points from the benchmark figure of 100 for the year 2000. Nationally, the index number was 94.2. The index number