Double-whammy for Gateway Cities

Municipalities are caught in vicious real estate cycle

CLARK UNIVERSITY IN WORCESTER this week unveiled a series of new data profiles suggesting Gateway Cities  are being hit with a real estate double-whammy: housing prices that are relatively low and rents that are relatively high. That combination is trouble because it means developers have little incentive to build new housing units in Gateway Cities

CommonWealth’s Spring 2016 issue is out!

The Spring 2016 print issue is in the mail, but if you can’t wait (and who can?) here’s a rundown of what’s in it. On the feature front, we have two interesting stories about the Legislature. One focuses on the paradox of Speaker Robert DeLeo, a seemingly affable, easy-going everyman who nevertheless maintains a vise-like

Not the usual faces in state Senate race

A changing East Boston draws new blood to special election

FOR DECADES, AN East Boston resident has held the state Senate seat representing the First Suffolk and Middlesex District, which extends north from the neighborhood to Revere and reaches west to sections of Cambridge. Michael LoPresti in the 1970s and 80s. Robert Travaglini in the 1990s and early 2000s. Anthony Petruccelli from 2007 until he

Warren hails civil rights legacy of education law

Says it’s crucial that Every Student Succeeds Act maintain the federal commitment to vulnerable children

WHILE IT’S EASY to get caught up in the details and debates over mandated testing regimens and teacher evaluation policies,the federal education law that stirred such backlash for more than a decade until it was replaced last year is one of the legislative pillars of the civil rights gains of the 1960s. Sen. Elizabeth Warren,

Charter schools’ early days in Massachusetts

Two players from 1993 ed reform reflect on charter history – and future

JUST HOURS BEFORE Gov. Charlie Baker joined with Hispanic leaders in East Boston on Tuesday afternoon to rally on behalf of his proposal to raise the cap on charter schools, two people who were there when charter schools were first authorized in the state 23 years ago shared some of that history – and considered

T oversight chief favors fare hike

Light turnout so far at public hearings

THE CHAIRMAN OF THE MBTA’S OVERSIGHT BOARD said on Wednesday that he believes the underlying arguments for a fare increase remain valid. He made his comment after hearing a top agency official say the two fare hike proposals the T is considering are attracting a light turnout so far at public hearings. Brian Shortsleeve, the

CommonWealth’s Winter 2016 issue is out!

The cover story in CommonWealth’s Winter 2016 issue explores the popularity of Gov. Charlie Baker and chalks his early success up to a combination of an MBA’s focus on the issues and a surprisingly emotional touch in connecting with voters. Says one admirer: “I love this guy more than any lesbian should love a Republican.” The

MassINC Year in Review

Happy Holidays and Happy New Year! 2015 has been an incredible year for the MassINC family which includes our Policy Center, CommonWealth magazine and the MassINC Polling Group. Please take a moment to look through the highlights of substantive research, civic events, and journalism from 2015 and consider making a year-end donation that will help

Social-emotional learning and the missing link in ed reform

First three years of life are crucial

UNDER THE UMBRELLA of “social-emotional learning” (SEL), there has been an explosion in knowledge about how children develop the kinds of skills that are crucial to academic and lifelong success. As defined by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), social-emotional learning includes five interrelated competencies: self-awareness, self-management (or self-regulation), social awareness, relationship

Riley’s turnaround effort bigger than schools

Lawrence groups and city in general pitch in to revamp education system

A FEW YEARS AGO, Lawrence’s schools were considered some of the worst in the state.  Only half of their students were finishing high school.  Test scores were abysmal.  Beyond the school walls, there was distress in the community: more than a quarter of the residents were living in poverty. The state appointed a receiver, Jeff

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