Introducing the latest publication from MassINC and the Gateway Cities Innovation Institute
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Alexia Lipman Research Intern, MassINC

Alexia is going to be a junior at Claremont McKenna College in sunny southern California where she is studying Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE). Alexia enjoys studying philosophy, watching films at Kendall Square, discussing politics, and being a pescatarian. She is originally from Harvard, MA — a sleepy (but quaint) town in Central Mass. Alexia is very excited to be interning for MassINC!

ARTICLES By Alexia Lipman

Establishing Principles for Accountability

Perspectives from small-to-midsize urban districts and their allies

The Next Generation Accountability Learning Community (NGALC) is a group of roughly two dozen New England education leaders who have come together to look at the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) from the perspective of small-to-midsize urban districts. Members of the NGALC gathered twice this summer to hear from experts and exchange ideas on this

Exploring Foundational Questions For Next Generation Accountability

These reflections have been prepared by the staff of the Next Generation Accountability Learning Community (NGALC). The NGALC is a group of roughly two dozen New England educators interested in the implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) from the perspective of small-to-midsize urban districts. In the pages that follow, we summarize foundational questions

ESSA Updates

A look at how stakeholders are responding to the USDOE’s draft regulations

While many lauded ESSA for providing more flexibility to state and local educators, many state officials, advocacy groups, and education experts have expressed concern over proposed ESSA regulations issued in May 2016. Their chief concerns pertain to how the regulations overstep the language of the original statute. Some of the most common objections to the

NGALC Meeting 2 Recap

Measuring social-emotional skills, school climate, and CCR

Last Thursday, the NGALC convened to look at how next generation accountability frameworks integrate college and career readiness, school climate, and social-emotional skills. The group’s discussion pivoted on how accountability policies ensure that we don’t undercut nonacademic learning, while avoiding the unintended consequences that the introduction of high-stakes measures can produce. Our expert presenters explored

NGALC Dispatch #1

Exploring Foundational Questions For Next Generation Accountability

How can educators make the Every Student Succeeds Act a pivot to smarter, next generation school accountability? With generous support from the Barr Foundation, the Next Generation Accountability Learning Community (NGALC) is examining this question with an emphasis on small-to-midsize cities, communities that serve a disproportionate share of the disadvantaged students — the core focus

Four education experts lined up for second meeting

Experts will delve into additional metrics used in school accountability

Four diverse experts – Martin West of Harvard University, Katie Buckley of Transforming Education, Mariann Lemke of AIR, and Patrick Kyllonen of ETS – will serve as our expert leaders at the second NGALC meeting. They will present on new innovations in accountability surrounding college and career readiness, social emotional learning, and school climate. For

NGALC Meeting 1 Recap

Measuring Academic Achievement and Student Growth

On June 29th, MassINC hosted the first meeting of the Next Generation Accountability Learning Community for small to midsize urban districts. State and local education leaders from across New England gathered to discuss the opportunities presented by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Session one focused on measuring academic achievement and student growth. Ryan Reyna

Emerging out of the Gateway Cities Vision

The NGLAC is born from a multi-year effort to advance an education agenda for small-to-midsize urban districts in Massachusetts

In 2007, MassINC co-authored a study with the Brookings Institution that exposed a deep divide between job growth and prosperity in Boston, and struggling, regional cities in other parts of the state. These regional cities had long been “Gateways” to the middle class for generations of Massachusetts families, but the concentration of activity in the

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