How much learning was lost?

On Wednesday, July 1, MassINC and The MassINC Polling Group held a Zoom forum exploring the results of a landmark survey of Massachusetts K-12 parents. The poll focused on parents’ experiences with remote learning during COVID-19. Event Recording Key Findings According to the findings, Massachusetts’ K-12 parents experienced very different engagement levels from schools and

Speaking up for Gateway City Teachers

The Gateway Cities Journal

Schools are finishing up for the year, but the emotional toll of the pandemic bears down on Gateway City educators harder than ever. For the past three months, they engaged in heroic efforts: helping families find food, consoling those who lost loved ones, leading painful dialogues on race and identity. Gateway City districts haven’t been

Community college is key to rethinking higher-ed

With coronavirus drawing attention to widespread socioeconomic disparities, many are calling for renewed effort to combat inequality. From near universal health care to paid family leave, Massachusetts is already a leading state when it comes to progressive policies. But pubic higher education—perhaps the strongest economic leveler—stands out as an area where Massachusetts trails. So many

Distilling local accountability lessons from near and far

Gateways Episode 22

As the education funding debate heats up on Beacon Hill, Ben continues our series on local accountability with a look at Chicago, IL and Springfield, MA. In a short chat with MassInc intern Alexis Polokoff, Ben unpacks Chicago's famed local school council model. Next, Ben interviews Paul Foster, Chief

Riley casts vision for education change

Says 'deeper learning,' new assessments should be part of next chapter

WHEN JEFF RILEY took the reins as state education commissioner early last year he suggested it was time to turn the page on 25 years of education reform efforts, pointing to stalled achievement scores, a stubbornly persistent achievement gap, and an unhealthy focus on testing. But exactly what he had in mind for the next

New school poverty figures obscure need in Gateway Cities

Since Massachusetts passed education reform in 1993, the share of Gateway City students who are low-income has risen from less than half to two-thirds. This concentration of poverty in Gateway City school districtsmeans nearly every student in these urban centers now attends a school wheremore than 40 percent of the students are poor—a threshold social

Financing Education Reform

The Next Chapter

The Building on What Works Coalition  released a  white paper this week that looks at creative new ways to invest in the learning models of the future. As leaders on Beacon Hill solidify budget priorities for the next fiscal year, the paper explores near-term steps that could be taken in the FY 2016 budget to pave the

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