Tracy A. Corley, PhD Transit-Oriented Development Fellow, MassINC

Dr. Tracy A. Corley, MassINC’s Transit-Oriented Development Fellow, thrives on creating economic opportunities and sustainable livelihoods for people in our world’s metropolitan regions. She brings expertise in economic development, business, labor markets, architecture, law, and public policy to MassINC. As the TOD Fellow, she convenes political and community leaders to spur inclusive development in Massachusetts’ Gateway Cities.  

Prior to joining MassINC, Dr. Corley split time between Boston and the German Rhineland, conducting doctoral research on informal work in Germany’s skilled trades and crafts sector. She obtained multiple grants for this research, including German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) funding. The Berlin Social Science Center (WZB), Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies (MPIfG), and Institute for Labor, Skills and Training (IAQ) hosted her during her investigations in Germany. 

Previously, Dr. Corley lived in Seattle, Washington, where she coordinated strategy and planning for Seattle Jobs Initiative, founded two consulting firms, and served as the Vice Chair of Small Business on the Seattle Chamber of Commerce Board of Trustees. Her diverse experience included work in sustainability, energy efficiency, clean technology, finance, banking, and telecommunications. She has also worked as an architect and graphic designer in Seattle, WA, and Greenville, SC. 

Dr. Corley attained her B.A. in Architecture Design from Clemson University in 1995 and her M.S. in Public Policy and Ph.D. in Law and Public Policy from Northeastern University in 2018.

ARTICLES By Tracy A. Corley, PhD

A Complex Recipe for Housing Financing

Brockton Offers Formula for Gateway Cities

Rob May, Brock- ton’s director of economic devel- opment and planning, famously offers up his seven-layer dip to any- one with a taste for the city’s downtown. A 121B Urban Re- newal plan forms the base. Then, he mixes in 40Q District Improvement Financing, a 40R Smart Growth Overlay District, a 40V Hous-ing Development Zone and a Transformative Development District.

Combining HDIP and OZ for Transformative Transit-Oriented Development in Gateway Cities

This policy brief is the second in a series exploring state and local level approaches to generating transformative transit-oriented development (TTOD) in Gateway Cities. Here, our thinking is that the state’s commuter rail system would receive much more use—and spur greater, more transformative Gateway City investment—if rail station areas were primed for compact TOD. The

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